An Important Juyo Token Shigezane Katana

Poa

Translation of NBTHK Juyo Certificate

Jūyō-tōken at the 50th jūyō shinsa held on June October 15, 2004
katana, mumei: Shigezane (重真)
Kagawa Prefecture, Yamanishi Tsuyoshi (⼭⻄毅)
Measurements
nagasa 67.8 cm, sori 0.9 cm, motohaba 2.9 cm, sakihaba 2.0 cm, kissaki-nagasa 3.2 cm, nakago-nagasa
15.8 cm, nakago-sori 0.15 cm
Description
Keijō: shinogi-zukuri, iori-mune, rather wide mihaba, no noticeable taper, shallow sori, chū-kissaki
Kitae: overall rather standing-out itame that is mixed with mokume, nagare, and prominent nagare
sections, and that features ji-nie, fine chikei, and a straight sugu-utsuri
Hamon: suguha-chō in nioi-deki with ko-nie that is mixed with angular gunome, gunome, ko-gunome,
ko-chōji, many ashi and yō, and kinsuji and sunagashi, the midare elements of the ha are overall
rather small dimensioned and tend to slant in places
Bōshi: gently undulating notare-komi with a ko-maru-kaeri and hakikake at the tip
Horimono: on both sides a bōhi that runs as kaki-nagashi into the tang
Nakago: ō-suriage, kirijiri, katte-sagari yasurime, three mekugi-ana, mumei
Explanation
A theory says that Bizen Osafune Shigezane (重真) was the younger brother of Motoshige
(元重). Extant dated works range from the end of the Kamakura period, i.e., from Karyaku two
(嘉暦, 1327), to the mid-Nanbokuchō period, i.e., to Enbun four (延⽂, 1359). This active period
matches with that of Motoshige, and there is also the theory that there were two generations
Shigezane. Regarding Shigezane’s workmanship, we see a kitae in itame-nagare that is mixed with
jifu, a suguha-chō hamon that is mixed with a prominent amount of angular elements, and a pointed
bōshi, thus, altogether we recognize a style that is close to Motoshige and that also incorporates
stylistic elements of the Aoe School.
This blade shows a kitae in an overall rather standing-out itame that is mixed with mokume and
nagare and that features ji-nie, fine chikei, and a straight sugu-utsuri. The hamon is a suguha-chō in
nioi-deki with ko-nie that is mixed with angular gunome, gunome, ko-gunome, ko-chōji, many ashi and
yō, and kinsuji and sunagashi. The midare elements o the ha are overall rather small dimensioned
and tend to slant in places. With the prominent nagare in the kitae, the angular gunome in the
hamon, and the small dimensioned midare elements that tend to slant in places, we arrive at the
style of the Motoshige group in particular at that of Shigezane, whereupon we are in agreement
with the period attribution to this smith. A masterwork among all blades attributed to Shigezane